Liberals Force $125 Work Tax on Ontario Tradesmen

(QUEEN’S PARK) - Randy Hillier, Ontario PC Party Critic for Labour, and the PC Caucus have uncovered another new secret tax grab by Dalton McGuinty’s Liberal Government. Hillier demanded in Question Period today that McGuinty reveal the truth behind their new $50 Million work tax on Ontario’s hardworking skilled tradesmen. In 2010 Dalton McGuinty forced the Ontario College of Trades onto Ontario’s tradesmen – today the PC Caucus has learned that the College of Trades will force a $125 per person work tax each year on all 470,000 tradesmen in the Province.

“McGuinty imposed the College of Trades on workers that never even had a chance to vote on whether or not they wanted a college of trades in the first place,” said Hillier. “Today the Liberals have implemented a cash grab work tax on almost half a million skilled tradesmen in Ontario.”

The College of Trades will also expand the compulsory membership into the Working Family’s Coalition which funds the Liberals re-election campaign. Patrick Dillon coincidentally heads both of these organisations.

When questioned today how he could justify forcing a new work tax on hardworking Ontario skilled tradesmen, Dalton McGuinty tried to sidestep the issue. Hillier pressed McGuinty on the issue, where Dalton was forced to reveal that if the College chose to levy a new work tax on Ontario tradesmen, he fully endorses such taxation.

“Once again the Ontario PCs have found another secret Liberal tax grab on hardworking Ontario families,” said Hillier. “McGuinty and his cronies at the Working Families Coalition have found yet another way to fund their Liberal re-election war chest.”

“While these McGuinty Liberals continue to raise taxes on Ontario families, the Ontario PCs and Leader Tim Hudak will lower taxes,” said Hillier. “We have brought forward our plan for change, changebook, which will lower taxes on all hardworking Ontario families.”

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